How-To: Battle Armor

You will need these items:
    
Paint (black and any other color you want to work with)
     Brushes (1/4 flat, 3/0 fine tipped, 10/0 fine tipped should do)
     Hobby Knife
     Super glue
     Paper towel
 

     We’ll start off with the first step, purchasing the Battle Armor. There are many to choose from, anywhere from Inner Sphere standard Battle Armor to the newest Clan Elemental suits from the Field Manual series. Chose the armor that suits your unit and fiction and get to work! I’ll be using Clan Coyote Salamander Battle Armor that is being placed in my 34th Strike Cluster of Delta Galaxy.

 

Step One: 
     Separate the armor from its tree. All Battle Armor comes in trees of three troopers each, usually featuring three variants of the armor. These are usually a machine gun trooper, a small laser trooper, and a flamer trooper. Take a pair of 6 inch wire cutters and snip the BA fro their tree.

 

Step Two:
     Basing your mini. Two options here really. Either put your squad or star all on a base or place each squad or star member on a penny or something to that effect.

Step Three:
     Primer the mini. Take a flat black and a brush and primer the mini. Make sure that you get the entire mini blackened. Make sure that you don’t leave any crevices with out paint as these will show up later in your work. Let the pieces dry for about ten minutes or less if you are using acrylic paint. If you are using oil’s, it might take a little longer.

 

Step Four:
     Dry brush the mini the base color you want. For the example, I chose to use a Cobalt Blue and black arms. Dip the tip of your brush into the paint, then wipe of almost all of the paint onto a paper towel. Holding the figure in your hand, run the brush over the mini forcefully, leaving paint on the upraised area’s. Remember to leave the depressed areas black as you brush, but this is accomplished by not having much paint on the brush.

Step Five :
     Weathering your Battle Armor. Using the same process that you used in step three, get even MORE paint off the brush and repeat with a dark ghost grey. This will give the mini the "worn" look. But be careful NOT to change the color of the mini from the base color. Steps four and five must be practiced a little to get them down correctly. Don’t give up hope if the first few jobs don’t turn out the way you want. Pin sol fixes all I like to say. If you mess up, just drop the mini in a Pin Sol bath and the paint should be eaten off, although you might need a tooth brush to get the remaining paint off.

 

Step Six:
     Identification color and detail. You’ll need some very small brushes for this part. I like adding a single color in for each star or squad to identify them quickly on the battle field. Paint a section of the BA your identification color, like in the example picture. Or you can try your hand at small numbers. Or caution strips. The sky is the limit!

Step Seven:
     Flocking. You’ll need some model railroad "grass" or turf as it’s called. I use Elmer’s glue to put in the base and then sprinkle in small railroad gravel and then drop on healthy amounts of turn. Let this set for awhile, 15 minutes or more, and then pick the piece up and shake off the loose turf. If there are area’s that didn’t take to the glue and turf, redo this until you get it to your liking.

 

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Use of Pigments

To players and hobbyists, the art of painting miniatures can feel overwhelming. There are so many choices to make - choosing the mini, the scheme, paint brands, paint brushes, and techniques. It seems never-ending, like there’s another whole world that you don’t understand each time you try a new project. Even once you have started to grow in the hobby and have some basics under your belt, the more advanced techniques can feel like an insurmountable wall. My aim here is to break down one of those walls and take some of the fear out of trying something new. My subject today is applying dry pigments.

 

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As part of the CSO Team's effort to support Iron Wind Metals website updates, I recently received a copy of the Tonbo Superheavy Transport VTOL, as described in Catalyst Game Labs' Technical Readout 3085, pages 52-53.

I opened the baggie to find...

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As part of the CSO Team's effort to support Iron Wind Metals website updates, I recently received a copy of the Tonbo Superheavy Transport VTOL, as described in Catalyst Game Labs' Technical Readout 3085, pages 52-53.

I opened the baggie to find...

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For me weathering is something that truly makes a Mech ‘come alive’. I just love it as it can add so much detail and character to a miniature. A couple of times I have tried to paint a clean Mech with a shiny ‘out-of-the-factory’ scheme, but I can’t. I always come back and add at least a little bit of wear and tear. Hey, even with Jamie Wolf as the pilot the paint scheme will suffer scratches and wear around the feet just moving out of the factory.

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