How-To: Drybrush

You will need these items:
Paint (black and any other color you want to work with)
Brushes (1/4 flat, 3/0 fine tipped, 10/0 fine tipped should do)
Hobby Knife
Super glue
Paper towel
Pen Vice
Step One:
Take the pieces of your desired miniature out of the Blister and inspect it. Find any imperfections (flash or mold lines) and use your hobby knife to clean these off. Then dry fit each piece on the figure to make sure they fit correctly. If they don’t, again use the knife to make the pieces fit. Lastly, take your pin vice and assortment of drill bits and drill out the missile and laser ports. This adds a bit of realism and depth to these items. Superglue the pieces together, making sure they are good and dry before moving on.

 

Step Two:
Taking the flat black paint, brush on the paint to the figure making sure thatyou cover the entire figure. This will come in handy as you’ll see in the next few steps.

 

Step Three:
Here is the first part of the painting that will help define your figure. This is what we call dry brushing. Taking the ¼ flat brush, dip it in the desired color that you would like to paint your figure. I am using white because I am going to do the DCMS’s 7th Ghost (I use white instead of light grey, but to each their own) Dip the tip of your brush in the paint, and then wipe the paint off the best you can on the paper towel.
Step Four:
Then, run the brush over the figure evenly, trying to get paint on the panels and leaving paint out of the depressions and figure detail lines. This will be the base fort he rest of your painting. If you want to do a scheme with more than one color, you need to do a dry brushing of each color over the area you would like to paint that particular color.
Step Five:
Now we come to the tricky part. Taking the 3/0 brush, begin filling in the panel were you can see the off color paint. Take care not to get the paint in the detail lines; this will make your figure stand out with detail and make give the miniature a solid color.
Step Six:
Now, I’m not perfect and you’re not perfect. I get paint in the lines. Now, the late J.Frazier would paint in the lines with an itsy bitsy brush. Me, I’m not that talented so I cheat and use a .005 Micron Pen. Helps define the lines of the figure and helps them stand out.
Step Seven:
Now, with any other color but white, I would do a weathering dry brush with Dark Ghost Grey. This helps lighten up darker paints and gives you the warn look. It also adds highlights to the areas that would normaly receive these in scale. Also, this helps bring out line detail. I don’t do this step to white miniatures as it doesn’t show up too well.
Step Eight:
Detail painting. This is where you add symbols and other small scale things with paint. I painted the chains with a flat black to fit the scheme description in the Field Manual. I also gave it two gold links to signify two kills that the pilot has been credited with.
Step Nine:
Now the decaling. If you have access to them, great. I buy my decals from Brian "Piranha" Plunket of Fighting Piranha Graphics. They are white backed and water slide decals that are made in scale for Battle Tech. If you are going to use decals, buy a decalsetting solution as well a s it really helps. Brush on the solution were you want to apply the decal and then slide off the decal from the paper, place it were you want it, and then brush over it with the solution.
Step Ten:
Now, the flocking. Paint your hex base a earth color, hopefully a darker brown. Taking some elmers glue, apply this to the base and then drop in some of the model rail road stones. After doing that, liberally apply the flocking and let it set for about 30 minutes. Once the time has passed, take the miniature and shake off the flocking that won’t stay on the base.
Step Eleven:
Now, it’s time for the Testors DulCoat. Spray it down following the directions on the can. Apply two to three coats to keep the paint securely on the miniature. This will also keep the flocking on the base. After the coats have dried, paint in the cockpit gloss black. There, you are done! Try this a few times to get it down as practice makes you better when painting. Don’t worry if your first few times don’t look good. Keep trying!

 

This article was first published in the Solaris Sentinal #17 Feb 2002.

 

Assembling WoB Spectral Omnifighters

 I recently picked up the three miniatures for the three Word of Blake Spectral Omnifighters. When I sat down to assemble the models, I realized that they have a large number of pieces and that telling the difference between the various fins and wings could be challenging, especially for someone new to assembling and painting minis. In fact, it seemed like there were way more pieces than should reasonably fit on an aerospace fighter.

Use of Pigments

To players and hobbyists, the art of painting miniatures can feel overwhelming. There are so many choices to make - choosing the mini, the scheme, paint brands, paint brushes, and techniques. It seems never-ending, like there’s another whole world that you don’t understand each time you try a new project. Even once you have started to grow in the hobby and have some basics under your belt, the more advanced techniques can feel like an insurmountable wall. My aim here is to break down one of those walls and take some of the fear out of trying something new. My subject today is applying dry pigments.

 

Assembling the Tonbo

Assembling the Tonbo

As part of the CSO Team's effort to support Iron Wind Metals website updates, I recently received a copy of the Tonbo Superheavy Transport VTOL, as described in Catalyst Game Labs' Technical Readout 3085, pages 52-53.

I opened the baggie to find...

Assembling the Tonbo

As part of the CSO Team's effort to support Iron Wind Metals website updates, I recently received a copy of the Tonbo Superheavy Transport VTOL, as described in Catalyst Game Labs' Technical Readout 3085, pages 52-53.

I opened the baggie to find...

How-To: Weathering

 Battletech Miniature Weathering
 For me weathering is something that truly makes a Mech ‘come alive’. I just love it as it can add so much detail and character to a miniature. A couple of times I have tried to paint a clean Mech with a shiny ‘out-of-the-factory’ scheme, but I can’t. I always come back and add at least a little bit of wear and tear. Hey, even with Jamie Wolf as the pilot the paint scheme will suffer scratches and wear around the feet just moving out of the factory. 

Battletech Miniature Weathering

For me weathering is something that truly makes a Mech ‘come alive’. I just love it as it can add so much detail and character to a miniature. A couple of times I have tried to paint a clean Mech with a shiny ‘out-of-the-factory’ scheme, but I can’t. I always come back and add at least a little bit of wear and tear. Hey, even with Jamie Wolf as the pilot the paint scheme will suffer scratches and wear around the feet just moving out of the factory.

Painting a Clan Wolverine Scheme

A writeup on painting a Clan Wolverine Scheme

Painting a Clan Wolverine Scheme

A writeup on painting a Clan Wolverine Scheme

Painting a Not-Named Clan Mech

Painting a Not-Named Mech

Long awaited for practically decades, the paint schemes of the Not-Named Clan’s various units will soon be revealed.

Painting a Not-Named Clan Mech

Long awaited for practically decades, the paint schemes of the Not-Named Clan’s various units will soon be revealed.

IIkasur Shogunate Walkthrough

A tutorial for painting a Shogunate scheme.

Small Terrain Boards

A tutorial on how to make small terrain boards for mini photography

Paints, Lights, Cameras and Colors

 An overview of various techniques that you can use to improve each of the key areas mentioned.

Painting a Clan Coyote scheme

A brief writeup on how to paint a Clan Coyote scheme.

Painting a Clan Jade Falcon scheme

A brief writeup on how to paint a Clan Jade Falcon scheme.

Hastur! Hastur! Hastur!

A Painting Tutorial for Operation Klondike

The colors of the Nation of Hastur are yellow ochre and black, the latter usually being added as wavy lines. Many warriors place their interpretation of the Yellow Sign in a prominent place on their machines. The Yellow Sign consists of an irregular three-armed cross, with no two exactly alike.

Painting a Clan Hell's Horses scheme

A brief writeup on how to paint a Clan Hell's Horses scheme.

Painting a Clan Nova Cat Scheme

A brief writeup on how to paint a Clan Nova Cat scheme.

Painting a Clan Wolf Scheme

A brief writeup on how to paint a Clan Wolf scheme.

Painting a Clan Blood Spirit Scheme

A brief writeup on how to paint the Clan Blood Spirit Alpha Galaxy scheme.