IIkasur Shogunate Walkthrough

 

  I wanted to have a nice intro. After several tries I gave up. This is why I’m not a writer. Can we just skip to the painting?

  Alright, we’ve got a basic description of light blue with white highlights, and sections of darker blue. Not too much to go on, so feel free to take liberties with the patterning. I’ll show you how I took out my inability to write on a Hussar, though you may find other arrangements more suited to the minis you paint.

  The first step in bringing out some Shogunate minis (after the usual prep and assembly) is to lay down your base coat. I blocked out the light and darker blue areas to get a feel for them right from the start. No point doing a bunch of work only to decide that you want the dark blue on the lower leg instead of the upper, or something like that.

  Now we’ll start building depth into both colours by adding a wash. Here I used a medium blue ink on the lighter areas and just a thinned darker blue paint on the darker areas. To me, the exact brands and shades are far less important than making good use of the materials you do have.

  The white highlights will go on next. Adding them now instead of before the washes of the previous steps means that the deeper shade of the wash is down in the panel lines already, blending it into the rest of the paint job without having to be extra careful applying a wash around areas you don’t want washed. This is actually an off-white and not a true white at this stage – pure white will be needed for the highlight layer.

  Time to pretty up the paint job by adding the highlights and adding black to the cockpit, weapon ports, and anywhere else that makes sense. If you want to keep it clean looking, it’s nearly done. From here, you could simply lay down some metallic parts, and thrown in any extra details you’re up to, like decals and jewelling. For this mini, I wanted it to be beat up a bit. The Pentagon forces didn’t have a good support apparatus, so this thing isn’t going to get a fresh-from-the-factory look.

 Whoops, got distracted by some Wolverines and missed out on any in-between stages, so we’ll be jumping to the nearly-finished point. Many of those processes are better left to their own How-To articles anyways. To sum up the changes we’ve got decals (just a number on the right torso), metals added and washed, cockpit jewelled, wear added, and targeted washes to help make it look dirty, oily, and rusty. The one thing you’ve got to remember in the order of these details is to apply any decals before wear and streaking. That way the decals look like part of the weathered paint job instead of sitting pristine on top of it.

 

Finish off the base, and the mini is ready to roll. Here I went with a broken city type of terrain, tying into the battered infrastructure of Arcadia by the time of Operation Klondike.

Assembling WoB Spectral Omnifighters

 I recently picked up the three miniatures for the three Word of Blake Spectral Omnifighters. When I sat down to assemble the models, I realized that they have a large number of pieces and that telling the difference between the various fins and wings could be challenging, especially for someone new to assembling and painting minis. In fact, it seemed like there were way more pieces than should reasonably fit on an aerospace fighter.

Use of Pigments

To players and hobbyists, the art of painting miniatures can feel overwhelming. There are so many choices to make - choosing the mini, the scheme, paint brands, paint brushes, and techniques. It seems never-ending, like there’s another whole world that you don’t understand each time you try a new project. Even once you have started to grow in the hobby and have some basics under your belt, the more advanced techniques can feel like an insurmountable wall. My aim here is to break down one of those walls and take some of the fear out of trying something new. My subject today is applying dry pigments.

 

Assembling the Tonbo

Assembling the Tonbo

As part of the CSO Team's effort to support Iron Wind Metals website updates, I recently received a copy of the Tonbo Superheavy Transport VTOL, as described in Catalyst Game Labs' Technical Readout 3085, pages 52-53.

I opened the baggie to find...

Assembling the Tonbo

As part of the CSO Team's effort to support Iron Wind Metals website updates, I recently received a copy of the Tonbo Superheavy Transport VTOL, as described in Catalyst Game Labs' Technical Readout 3085, pages 52-53.

I opened the baggie to find...

How-To: Weathering

 Battletech Miniature Weathering
 For me weathering is something that truly makes a Mech ‘come alive’. I just love it as it can add so much detail and character to a miniature. A couple of times I have tried to paint a clean Mech with a shiny ‘out-of-the-factory’ scheme, but I can’t. I always come back and add at least a little bit of wear and tear. Hey, even with Jamie Wolf as the pilot the paint scheme will suffer scratches and wear around the feet just moving out of the factory. 

Battletech Miniature Weathering

For me weathering is something that truly makes a Mech ‘come alive’. I just love it as it can add so much detail and character to a miniature. A couple of times I have tried to paint a clean Mech with a shiny ‘out-of-the-factory’ scheme, but I can’t. I always come back and add at least a little bit of wear and tear. Hey, even with Jamie Wolf as the pilot the paint scheme will suffer scratches and wear around the feet just moving out of the factory.

Painting a Clan Wolverine Scheme

A writeup on painting a Clan Wolverine Scheme

Painting a Clan Wolverine Scheme

A writeup on painting a Clan Wolverine Scheme

Painting a Not-Named Clan Mech

Painting a Not-Named Mech

Long awaited for practically decades, the paint schemes of the Not-Named Clan’s various units will soon be revealed.

Painting a Not-Named Clan Mech

Long awaited for practically decades, the paint schemes of the Not-Named Clan’s various units will soon be revealed.

Small Terrain Boards

A tutorial on how to make small terrain boards for mini photography

Paints, Lights, Cameras and Colors

 An overview of various techniques that you can use to improve each of the key areas mentioned.

Painting a Clan Coyote scheme

A brief writeup on how to paint a Clan Coyote scheme.

Painting a Clan Jade Falcon scheme

A brief writeup on how to paint a Clan Jade Falcon scheme.

Hastur! Hastur! Hastur!

A Painting Tutorial for Operation Klondike

The colors of the Nation of Hastur are yellow ochre and black, the latter usually being added as wavy lines. Many warriors place their interpretation of the Yellow Sign in a prominent place on their machines. The Yellow Sign consists of an irregular three-armed cross, with no two exactly alike.

Painting a Clan Hell's Horses scheme

A brief writeup on how to paint a Clan Hell's Horses scheme.

Painting a Clan Nova Cat Scheme

A brief writeup on how to paint a Clan Nova Cat scheme.

Painting a Clan Wolf Scheme

A brief writeup on how to paint a Clan Wolf scheme.

Painting a Clan Blood Spirit Scheme

A brief writeup on how to paint the Clan Blood Spirit Alpha Galaxy scheme.

Painting a Clan Goliath Scorpion Scheme

A brief writeup on how to paint the Clan Goliath Scorpion Tau Galaxy scheme.